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You are my favorite cousin and always will be. I will always remember the way you danced at me & steph's bat-mitzvah. You did your famous Michael Jackson moonwalk and threw me in the pool. I will always love you forever and ever. Every day I say your name and I think about you always. Love ya cuz.

Posted by Aaron

To our darling Aaron,

Your smile lit up our world. You were loved by all. Everyone knew you were their best friend. We treasured every day of your all too short life. You were a happy beautiful baby and a fantastic man whose charismatic personality delighted all who met you. We will always miss you and love you and remember you. Even though your life was so short, you had a lasting impact on all our lives.

Posted by Aunt Carla and Uncle Alan

I learned of you from cousin Dave & am thinking of you and your wonderful family on this 20th Anniversary. The stories of your never-ending sense of humor & larger than life personality bring smiles to the faces of those who hear them. Your legacy live on, today & always.

God Bless your family.

Posted by Jenny

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In Remembrance
Age:
24
Place of Residence:
New York, NY
Location on 9/11:
One WTC
Occupation:
Cantor Fitzgerald | Bond Broker
Biography:

Once, Aaron Horwitz had what most people would consider a supremely lousy day. A friend asked him how he would rate it, from 1 to 10, with 1 the worst.

"Eight," he replied.

You could get a contact high from Mr. Horwitz, 24, a bond broker at Cantor Fitzgerald with the almost laughable responsibility of entertaining clients and making them feel like the most important people in the world.

As if anyone had to pay him. For he was not just a showman, who did the Michael Jackson moonwalk on bar tops and who, at a museum, drew his own masterpiece on a mist-coated window next to a Rembrandt.

He seized souls, not letting go until he made them merry. He met a guy in a toy store and, moments later, the two were having a hula hoop contest. He insisted a concierge stop weeping over a bad breakup, then called her at 2:30 a.m. to make sure. He sweet-talked hostesses at four-star restaurants into producing tables for eight (and their phone numbers for dates) and persuaded a street masseur to let Mr. Horwitz give him a massage.

"You could talk to a brick wall," his father told him. Yes, allowed the son, but he preferred chatting with a mirror. He often did so, then fell over, laughing.